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Top 44 interesting facts about H1n1

Following is our collection of incredible H1n1 fact check articles and charts explaining insights about H1n1. Sometimes weird, funny, and true H1n1 facts.

h1n1 facts
What is H1n1?
  1. The 1918 flu pandemic (caused by the H1N1 virus) killed 50 to 100 million people worldwide in under 2 years. It was censored from reporting in Germany, France, the UK and US for wartime morale. Since reporting was widespread and not censored in neutral Spain it became known as the Spanish Flu.

  2. Frogs Can Kill H1N1 Flu Viruses With The Peptide From Their Slimy Mucus

  3. Influenza virus A (H1N1) was the type responsible for the Spanish Flu pandemic in 1918 (between 50 and 100 million people died) and the Swine Flu pandemic in 2009 (as many as 579,000 people died).

  4. 50 million people died worldwide from H1N1 in 1918

  5. The 2009 H1N1 swine flu outbreak killed 200 000 people around the world, 80% of them younger than 65

  6. Sea otters have joined the ranks of ducks, chickens, pigs, whales, horses and elephant seals—all animals that can contract influenza. According to a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, sea otters living in a remote area in Washington state were carriers of the H1N1 virus.

  7. A variant of H1N1, also known as Swine Flu Outbreak, was also the cause of the deadly Spanish Flu of 1918

  8. In Swine Flu Outbreak 2009, about 57 million Americans (1 in 5) caught the swine flu virus, H1N1.

  9. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, Canadian researchers found that seasonal flu shots from 2008 almost doubled the risk of infection with pandemic flu

  10. Increased cases of Narcolepsy were linked to the H1N1 “swine flu” vaccination in Scandinavian and other European countries.

Data charts about H1n1

h1n1 fact data chart about DNA Walks, Comparing COVID 19, H1N1, and SARS
DNA Walks, Comparing COVID 19, H1N1, and SARS

What are some fun facts about h1n1?

Flu designations like H1N1 refer to important molecules on the virus. Hemagglutinin (H) facilitates infection, while viral neuraminidase (N) promotes the release of newly replicated viruses.

the Pandemic Drive Through was invented by Dr. Eric Weiss in 2009 and tested at Stanford Hospital in response to the H1N1 (Swine Flu).

The flu vaccine that was used in Europe during the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic has been linked to rising cases of narcolepsy

the H1N1 (swine flu) virus from the 2009 pandemic is still prevalent and is now the most reported flu in the USA.

the Swine Flu (H1N1) in 2009 was declared as a pandemic by WHO which it had killed an estimated 151,000 - 575,000 people in the one year before it became a seasonal flu.

H1N1 was a descendant of the Spanish Flu, which was the most devastating single disease outbreak in modern history.

H1N1 was extinct in the wild from 1957. In 1977 it reappeared and has been with us ever since.

Spain was the only country who could honestly report deaths from H1N1 in 1918 because wartime censorship demanded that at-war countries underreport their dead, so as to not present themselves as vulnerable or on the verge of defeat. Thus, it was called "Spanish flu."

What the ‘H’ and ‘N’ represent in influenza A viruses like H1N1 (Swine flu). They represent the proteins Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase, which are 2 of the 11 proteins that are found in an influenza A virus. They’re particularly important in drug research and activation of antibodies.

What the ‘H’ and ‘N’ represent in influenza A viruses like H1N1 (Swine flu). They represent the proteins Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase, which are 2 of the 11 proteins that are found in an influenza A virus. They’re particularly important in drug research and activation of antibodies.

the 2009 H1N1 Flu Pandemic in the US infected over 60 Million Americans, hospitalized 274,000 and killed 12,469 from April 12, 2009 - April 10, 2010 - fact check

the 2009 H1N1 Flu Pandemic in the US, infected over 60 Million Americans, hospitalized 274,000 and resulted in 12,469 deaths from April 12, 2009 - April 10, 2010

the 1918 H1N1 pandemic gained the nickname 'Spanish flu' because Spain was one of the only infected countries that was accurately reporting case numbers, leading to the false belief that Spain was particularly badly hit by the virus.

The 2009 U.S.A H1N1 outbreak was worse than COVID-19 coronavirus. And that the U.S. and other countries stopped reporting cases by late 2009.

the H1N1 Swine Flu killed over 12,000 Americans from 2009-2010 - fact check

the 2009-10 Swine Flu pandemic lasted 16 months, infected 700-1400 million people, and likely killed 500.000 people. It was the second pandemic involving H1N1 flu virus, the first one being the Spanish Flu of 1918.

H1N1 (Swine Flu) was the same strain as the Spanish flu and the 2009 outbreak killed ≈160,000-600,000 people.

the 2009 H1N1 swine flu killed 12,469 people in the US the first year, and in 2019, over 18,000 people were killed by the seasonal flu

The H1N1 swine flu virus originated in North Carolina, United States and was "the product of intensive farming."

In 1976, a United States mass immunization program prompted by the overreaction to an isolated H1N1 Swine Influenza outbreak (which had killed 1 and hospitalized 13) led to as many as many 500 cases of Guillain–Barré syndrome and at least 25 deaths.

The 2009 H1N1 swine flu was classified as a global pandemic; estimated 284,000 deaths and 61,000,000 cases. The CDC and WHO stopped counting deaths/cases after a certain point. The actual values are more than 15x the recorded and could be much higher than the estimated. - fact check

the last pandemic declared was in 2009, - H1N1 virus - fact check

In 2010 NaturalNews and the non-profit Consumer Wellness Center offered a $10,000 reward for anyone who could provide trusted, scientific evidence proving that any of the FDA-approved H1N1 vaccines were both safe and effective.

H1N1 virus (swine flu) continues to circulate as a seasonal flu virus, and cause illness, hospitalization, and deaths worldwide every year.

WHO | Seasonal influenza and influenza A(H1N1) - fact check